March 4, 2024

Mitchel Gilbeau

Hotel Heaven Awaits

Neha Kirpal’s photograph ‘How China Sees the Western World’ wins the Templeton Nature

Introduction

A photograph by Neha Kirpal titled ‘How China Sees the Western World’ has won the Templeton Nature Photography Competition for 2019. The award-winning photograph shows Beijing’s Tiananmen Square from a bird’s eye view, with hundreds of tourists on their feet and busy running towards the iconic Great Hall of the People. Commenting on winning this prestigious award, Neha said “I’m absolutely thrilled to be named as winner of this year’s Templeton Nature Photography Competition. It is wonderful to see my work recognised by so many people who love nature and enjoy photography.”

A photograph by Neha Kirpal titled ‘How China Sees the Western World’ has won the Templeton Nature Photography Competition for 2019.

Neha Kirpal’s photograph ‘How China Sees the Western World’ has won the Templeton Nature Photography Competition for 2019. The image shows Beijing’s Tiananmen Square from a bird’s eye view, with hundreds of tourists on their feet and busy running towards the iconic Great Hall of the People.

The competition was open to amateur photographers worldwide who submitted entries in three categories: animals in their natural habitat; plants in their natural habitat; and landscapes/seascapes/cityscapes (urban).

The award-winning photograph shows Beijing’s Tiananmen Square from a bird’s eye view, with hundreds of tourists on their feet and busy running towards the iconic Great Hall of the People.

Neha Kirpal took this photo while flying over Tiananmen Square in China. She explains how she did it: “I was looking at all these people from above and thought it would be interesting if I could get closer.”

Commenting on winning this prestigious award, Neha said “I’m absolutely thrilled to be named as winner of this year’s Templeton Nature Photography Competition. It is wonderful to see my work recognised by so many people who love nature and enjoy photography.”

“I’m absolutely thrilled to be named as winner of this year’s Templeton Nature Photography Competition,” Neha said. “It is wonderful to see my work recognised by so many people who love nature and enjoy photography.”

Neha has been taking pictures since she was a little girl, but it wasn’t until she had children that she began to take her hobby seriously. She started entering competitions in 2013 and has since won several awards including Best In Show at the Royal Photographic Society’s International Print Exhibition 2014, first place in their Open Competition 2015: Natural World and second place in 2017’s Open Competition: Natural History (People).

She says her inspiration comes from travel: “When I travel abroad or even locally around the UK there are always new subjects for me to try out different techniques on.”

Conclusion

The Templeton Nature Photography Competition is one of the most prestigious awards in the world, with a winner selected every year since 1996. The competition aims to promote awareness about nature conservation through photography.